Category Archives: Technical

for questions & answers or upkeep & performance hints regarding Mazdas

Technical Section – Question & Answers – Upkeep Hints

Please note: Questions and answers are provided for information and advice purposes. No liability either express or implied is assumed by reliance on the information presented either by the writers or the MC. Some or all of the below is from our Facebook group at www.facebook.com/groups/mazdaclubusa. This is just a part of what appears there and in the member magazine. Also be sure to see our Facebook group for immediate help from fellow members.

LED Interior Lights

Q:     I would like to install LED interior light in my 67 Mustang . Does anyone have any suggestions?

Paul Gibbons

A:     During the Pandemic period, This is what I did to my 2017 MX-5 GS “Stay at Home Project ” installing Interior !!

I installed the Android Auto Retro kit and Stainless steel Pedal Pads under my local Mazda Dealership. I love this CAR !!

Kevin Cheung

Kevin Cheung's 2017 MX-5 GS LED Lighting
Kevin Cheung's 2017 MX-5 GS LED Lighting
Kevin Cheung's 2017 MX-5 GS

Disable Daytime Running Lights

TECHNICAL SECTION – QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS – UPKEEP HINTS

Please note: Questions and answers are provided for information and advice purposes. No liability either express or implied is assumed by reliance on the information presented either by the writers or the MC. Some or all of the below is from our Facebook group at www.facebook.com/groups/mazdaclubusa. This is just a part of what appears there and in the member magazine. Also be sure to see our Facebook group for immediate help from fellow members.

Q:     Can anyone tell me how to disable daytime running lights on a 2019 Mazda CX-5? According to the owner’s manual it’s possible, but one page just refers me back to the other. Their manuals are awful!

Don Turner

A:     I found this from another thread and thought this would be very useful on the how-to forum for people who want to disable their DRL.

HERE’S HOW TO DO IT::

SETUP:

1) car set to ignition (car is active, but engine is off)

2) press brake pedal down and hold during the whole time

3) parking brake up

START:

you have to do the whole process once you start under 23 sec.

4) turn parking light on and off 5 times. on – off – on – off – on – off , etc.

under 2 sec start #5

5) turn hazard light on and off 5 times.

under 2 sec start #6

6) turn parking light on and off 5 times.

DONE:

7) to check if the DRL still comes on, simply disengage the parking brake. If it doesn’t come on, then you’re done. Otherwise repeat the process again.

Repeat same step to reactivate

Vernon Hastings

Technical Section – Q & A’s – Upkeep Hints

Please note: Questions and answers are provided for information and advice purposes. No liability either express or implied is assumed by reliance on the information presented either by the writers or the MC.

Some or all of the below is from our Facebook group at www.facebook.com/groups/mazdaclubusa. This is just a part of what appears there and in the member magazine.

Also be sure to see our Facebook group for immediate help from fellow members.

Q:     Anyone have an idea of how long a garage kept convertible top will last before replacement? I have a 2003 Miata. What would be the cost to replace?

Doug

Q:     I think a well cared for vinyl top should last 10+ years. It really depends upon how often you clean and treat it, and how long it sits under the sun, rain, hail.

I’ve never had a canvas top, but my understanding is that they are more difficult to keep clean and looking good.

To answer your cost question. A new Robbins vinyl top with rain rail will set you back close to $600, but there are many cheaper options, starting from around $175 for an eBay top.

Dougal McGuire

Technical Section – Q & A’s – Upkeep Hints

Please note: Questions and answers are provided for information and advice purposes. No liability either express or implied is assumed by reliance on the information presented either by the writers or the MC.

Some or all of the below is from our Facebook group at www.facebook.com/groups/mazdaclubusa. This is just a part of what appears there and in the member magazine.

Also be sure to see our Facebook group for immediate help from fellow members.

Q:     I recently purchased an used 2008 Mazda 3 (manual transmission) with about 120,00 miles on it. Sometimes, when I attempt to shift from 2nd to 3rd, the gearshift sticks, and I’m unable to shift into 3rd. I have to pull over and repeatedly jiggle the gearshift to pop it out of second gear. Also, when stopped, I’ve sometimes had trouble putting the car into 1st. And, overall, shifting from 1st to 2nd is a little rough. The brakes/clutch fluid is topped off, and we very recently installed an auto front disc brake conversion kit and were extremely careful to do it properly and tested the brakes many times, so it’s not that. Although the clutch and brakes seem fine,  I’m wondering if I should perhaps take my car to a brake services and transmission shop anyways?

LX Classic

A:     The solution to your issue is one of the three following things (ranked from most to least likely):

A new clutch. While the clutch material may well still have some life in it, the two halves of the disk have started to separate. They are still partially engaged even when you push the pedal all of the way to the floor. This is something you’ll find happens often with cars. Don’t t run it into the ground. Instead, use this opportunity to find a good and reliable auto repair shop and drive it in yourself. It is very clear that we need a clutch repair, so start by asking places if they know and can work with clutches.

A Clutch Master Cylinder and/or Clutch Slave Cylinder starting to fail. In this scenario, even when you push the pedal all of the way to the floor, the clutch pressure plate doesn’t fully release, and as with Option 1, the clutch disk is still partially engaged.

Low hydraulic fluid in the Clutch Master Cylinder and hydraulic hoses. It could be you are pumping (or have pumped) some air into the hydraulic clutch line, and the air is compressing instead of pushing on the pressure plate to open it up all of the way. The clutch disk is still partially engaged.

Q: Last week I was driving down the highway and my started making some weird noises and started to get very worried. I tried to contact a mechanic right away, but they were way to expensive. So I was wondering if you know where could I find some parts for my car. It’s a  2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee. Thanks, it would help me a lot!

A: Well, we’ve worked with many dealerships, try checking out dodge Ram dealership near me , and hopefully you’ll find what you’re looking for. Also a quick advise, sometimes is better to buy a used car instead of wasting a lot of money on parts for your car, keep that in mind!

Shio

Cleanest truck/pickup


-Once upon a time, a nice gentleman told me I had the cleanest truck on the internet. He then offered me $5,000 for that truck—without looking it over in person—which was my oxidized-red 1986 Mazda B2000 SE-5 single cab pickup truck. He flew from Texas to Los Angeles to exchange $5,000 in crisp cash in a plain white envelope for that li’l red pickup that had stolen his heart—and mine, too. I didn’t even try to clean it up too much before he bought it. I treated him to a nice Mexican lunch and then watched him drive away.

No too long after, he texted me during his road trip home to Texas, but not with tales of how the truck had broken down or overheated or somehow imploded. No. They were about how much fun he was having driving… the cleanest truck on the internet. I made a pretty penny selling that little red ’86 B2000 five-speed manual pickup, more than doubling my investment (after putting about 60,000 miles on it, to boot, while commuting 80 miles a day). The thing I also liked about the deal was that I didn’t have to find an Unwanted car buyer, or do anything at all really. Like I said he just came in, paid and left, so it was pretty effortless for me. Since then, in the nine years since selling that quintessential ’80s machine, I’ve thought about it quite a bit and use it as a benchmark for which to compare other Mazda minis on the road.

In the end, it’s indeed a classic case of the older-I-get-the-cooler-it-was syndrome, but that sturdy B2000 truly was remarkable. Find the better load vehicle deals at semi truck auctions.

1986 Mazda B2000 Se5

Photo 2/37   |   1986 Mazda B2000 Se5The interior was nearly flawless; I always joked it had lived in someone’s living room, but come to think of it, it actually might have. The dashboard was in better shape than those of trucks a decade or two newer. The pristine sliding bench seat, void of any headrests, left your head basically resting on the rear window. But because it had seatbelts, it felt safe enough; because it had power steering, it felt nimble enough.

1986 Mazda B2000 Se5 Rear

Photo 3/37   |   1986 Mazda B2000 Se5 RearThe body was pretty darn straight, and those robust bedsides could hold their own against dings, scuffs, and abuse. Although its unscathed, bare bed showed no signs of having done any real work in its lifetime, it was not a fragile truck. The SE-5 bed graphics were probably the most endearing feature, and you could not have paid me enough money to strip those rad emblems that screamed “I’m from the ’80s!”It shifted nicely through the gears, and despite its slightly sloppy manual stick-shift assembly, it was remarkably easy to drive. User participation was the name of the game, with manual windows, manual door locks (where you had to hold the handle up while closing the door in order to get the doors to lock), the aforementioned manual gearbox, and manual headlights.